Educational Leadership, ASCD's flagship journal, is intended for everyone interested in preK–12 education issues, including curriculum, instruction, supervision, and leadership. Each issue contains articles written by educators for educators. We particularly look for articles that inspire improved teaching and learning.

Educational Leadership is known for its theme issues. The more appropriate an article is for a theme issue, the more likely it is that we will be able to publish it. We also accept articles on non-theme-related topics if the subject is compelling and timely.

The EL editorial staff makes all decisions regarding publication. ASCD reserves the right to reject material, whether solicited or otherwise, if it lacks quality or timeliness. ASCD offers no remuneration for articles.

 

What We Look For

The best way to determine what kinds of articles we publish is to read the magazine.

Most published articles are between 1,500 and 2,500 words, are written in a conversational style, and cover topics that are useful for preK–12 educators. These are some of the qualities we look for:

  • Articles describing research-based solutions to current problems in education

  • Reasoned debate on controversial subjects

  • Opinion pieces that interweave experiences and ideas

  • Program descriptions (school, district, or state)

  • Practical examples that illustrate key points

  • An emphasis on explaining and interpreting research results rather than on methodology

  • International contributions

We are not looking for term papers or reviews of literature, and we rarely publish conventional research reports. We cannot review drafts and usually do not find query letters helpful; we prefer to read the manuscript. We do not publish articles that have been previously published, in print or electronic form. While your article is under review with us, we ask that you not submit it to another publication or post it on a website or blog—not even your own.

Please submit your manuscript under the appropriate upcoming theme category. If your manuscript does not fit any of our upcoming themes, please submit it under the Special Topic category.

For more information about the submission and editing process, please visit our web site.


September 2019

What New Teachers Need

Many new teachers quickly discover that they aren't fully prepared for the practical realities of running a classroom. So what should they know? This issue will take a close look at the craft of teaching, with an emphasis on providing strategic advice (and moral support) to new teachers and those who support them. What really works when it comes to planning and delivering a lesson or unit, or interacting with and engaging students? What traits and skills do high-performing teachers share, and how are they exemplified in the classroom? How can new teachers get there? Topics to be addressed include classroom management, lesson design and execution, educator confidence and efficacy, confronting biases, subject-area best practices, support networks and resources, and self-care. The issue will also highlight effective mentoring programs and other new-teacher support models.  

Deadline: April 1, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  •  Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  •  Number all pages.
     
  •  Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  •  Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  •  Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

October 2019

Making School a Safe Place

Findings from neuroscience and teachers' lived experiences show that it's hard for students to do most things involved in learning if they don't feel safe, known, and cared for within schools. This issue will look at how schools can cultivate a greater sense of overall safety—in both physical and emotional terms. How can school leaders ensure that students and teachers feel protected and free to learn and teach? How can they skillfully address incidents of violence, whether active or potential? How can schools be more responsive to the needs of students suffering from trauma and those whose differences may make them vulnerable to harassment or bullying? How can schools monitor how all students are faring (in terms of both health and school engagement), and what role do behavioral and mental health services play in helping schools create a deeper support system for students? 

Deadline: May 1, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  • Number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

November 2019

A Culture of Coaching

Instructional coaching isn't simply a box that needs to be checked: It's an opportunity for even the most effective educators to grow and learn from one another. This issue will explore how schools are creating cultures of coaching, so that all faculty see the practice as an essential and ongoing lever for instructional improvement. What are the key ingredients of successful coaching relationships? What coaching models have the biggest impact on individuals and teams? How are video and other technology tools being used to transform coaching? How can school leaders best support coaching and root it in instructional culture? How can school leaders, mentors, and others more skillfully incorporate coaching strategies into their work? 

Deadline: June 3, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  • Number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

December 2019/January 2020

Building Bridges for ELLs

English language learners (ELLs) are the fastest-growing student population group in the United States. Yet most teachers are not trained to work with these learners. This issue will look at the structures and strategies that schools can use to improve instruction for ELLs and maximize their learning opportunities. Articles will explore specific challenges these students face today, both in the classroom and in society. How can schools create supportive spaces for these students, tapping into their strengths and not allowing language differences to be a barrier to learning? What supports work best to drive learning for ELLs in different subject areas? The issue will also address how schools can include ELLs in all aspects of schooling—both general education classes and school activities—and create culturally responsive learning environments that help ELLs thrive. Initiatives to connect with parents and communities will also be highlighted. 

Deadline: July 1, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  • Number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

February 2020

Rooted in Reading

Developing strong, enthusiastic readers is one of the central objectives of schools, and yet reading instruction is often beset by complex structural challenges, shifting resources, and competing priorities. This issue will look at effective practices for teaching reading and supporting student engagement in reading at all grade levels. What should school leaders and teachers know about the latest research on reading instruction and literacy development—and how does it translate into the classroom? What works for struggling readers? How can schools create and support stronger cultures of reading? How has literacy changed in the 21st century, and what challenges and opportunities do those changes present? At the secondary level, what works in fostering critical literacy and close-reading skills—and inspiring a passion for reading? How can school leaders prioritize immersive reading skills as a key element of whole-child education?

Deadline: September 3, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  • Number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

March 2020

The Empowered Student

Giving students more say and control over their own education—as well as creating climates that foster student expression—has become a growing priority in K–12 education, intersecting with personalized and student-centered learning movements. But what does this look like in practice? How can educators create lessons and school environments that effectively leverage student voice and agency? What advantages does this create—and what challenges? How might this emphasis transform traditional curriculum and instructional frameworks and develop students as leaders and innovators? Topics to be addressed include the role of technology in shifting instructional paradigms, student activism, problem-solving skills, and student choice within the curriculum. 

Deadline: October 1, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  • Number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

April 2020

Deeper Discussions

Long considered ancillary to other academic priorities, oral communication skills are now increasingly seen as central to student growth and success. This issue will consider ways to go beyond traditional formats for classroom exchanges to discussions that promote higher-order thinking, effective communication, and social-emotional learning skills. What discussion strategies actively engage all students—not just outspoken students, but also introverted ones, students with learning disabilities, and English language learners? How can teachers facilitate nuanced discussions on tough topics, developing students' ability to consider other perspectives and exchange differing opinions? The issue will also look at how discussion skills contribute to whole-child learning and development and how educators can foster more effective discussions among themselves. 

Deadline: November 1, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  • Number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

May 2020

Learning and the Brain

Research in neuroscience is shedding new light on how students learn and develop. How can educators make the most of this information—and how can they sort genuine scientific findings from myths and hearsay? This issue will offer a solution-oriented look at brain science and education, highlighting both groundbreaking findings and practical takeaways. Key questions to be examined include: How might recent findings in neuroscience inform instructional practices and lesson planning? What aspects of learning have schools conventionally overlooked or discounted? How can schools create the best conditions to support student learning, including in the case of students suffering from trauma or adverse experiences? And what does the latest research on the brain and learning really say—or not say? 

Deadline: December 2, 2019

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  • Number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.

Please use this category to submit articles that may not fit any of our upcoming themes.

Note: While we do occasionally publish special topic articles of an exceptional nature, submissions that do not fit into an upcoming EL theme have a much smaller chance of publication. Response times on Special Topics submissions may also be longer. Thank you for your patience. 


How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  •  
    Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  •  
    Number all pages.
     
  •  
    Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  •  
    Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  •  
    Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.




Educational Leadership