Educational Leadership, ASCD's flagship journal, is intended for everyone interested in preK–12 education issues, including curriculum, instruction, supervision, and leadership. Each issue contains articles written by educators for educators. We particularly look for articles that inspire improved teaching and learning.

Educational Leadership is known for its theme issues. The more appropriate an article is for a theme issue, the more likely it is that we will be able to publish it. We also accept articles on non-theme-related topics if the subject is compelling and timely.

The EL editorial staff makes all decisions regarding publication. ASCD reserves the right to reject material, whether solicited or otherwise, if it lacks quality or timeliness. ASCD offers no remuneration for articles.

 

What We Look For

The best way to determine what kinds of articles we publish is to read the magazine.

Most published articles are between 1,500 and 2,500 words, are written in a conversational style, and cover topics that are useful for preK–12 educators. These are some of the qualities we look for:

  • Articles describing research-based solutions to current problems in education

  • Reasoned debate on controversial subjects

  • Opinion pieces that interweave experiences and ideas

  • Program descriptions (school, district, or state)

  • Practical examples that illustrate key points

  • An emphasis on explaining and interpreting research results rather than on methodology

  • International contributions

We are not looking for term papers or reviews of literature, and we rarely publish conventional research reports. We cannot review drafts and usually do not find query letters helpful; we prefer to read the manuscript. We do not publish articles that have been previously published, in print or electronic form. While your article is under review with us, we ask that you not submit it to another publication or post it on a website or blog—not even your own.

Please submit your manuscript under the appropriate upcoming theme category. If your manuscript does not fit any of our upcoming themes, please submit it under the Special Topic category.

For more information about the submission and editing process, please visit our web site.


November 2018

When Teachers Lead Their Own Learning

This issue will explore the rise of job-embedded, teacher-led professional development—and the challenges and opportunities it presents to schools. We’ll look at how teachers are taking professional learning into their own hands through PLCs, Edcamps, microcredentialing, video study, and social media. What works in creating and supporting such practices in schools?

Deadline: June 1, 2018

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.

  • Number all pages.

  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.

  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.



The Arts and Creativity in Schools

The arts hold tremendous potential to foster students’ creativity, improve academic performance, and boost social-emotional development. This issue will explore how schools can bring visual arts, music, theater, dance, creative writing, and other arts into the content areas and use the arts to engage marginalized students.

Deadline: July 2, 2018

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.

  • Number all pages.

  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.

  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.




February 2019

The Tech-Savvy School

How does a school become a leader in innovation—one that takes advantage of advancements in digital technology in meaningful and fully integrated ways? This issue will explore how school leaders effectively implement new technology that deepens learning and better supports teachers.

Deadline: September 3, 2018

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.

  • Number all pages.

  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.

  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.





March 2019

The Power of Instructional Leadership

School leaders set the tone and direction for what happens in classrooms. How can they develop the skills, knowledge, and workload balance they need to understand teachers’ and students’ needs and effectively guide learning?

Deadline: October 1, 2018

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.

  • Number all pages.

  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.

  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.






April 2019

Separate and Still Unequal: Race in America’s Schools

As the nation marks the 65th anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education in 2019, this issue will examine race in America’s schools today. How can schools and educators work to fulfill the promise of Brown to dismantle segregation and inequity in education?

Deadline: November 1, 2018

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.

  • Number all pages.

  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.

  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.






May 2019

What Teens Need from Schools

The teenage years are unique, and today’s teens face new challenges as well as opportunities. This issue will explore how schools can work smarter to keep middle and high school students healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged. What do today’s teens need most, in terms of both academic and social supports?

Deadline: December 3, 2018

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.

  • Number all pages.

  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.

  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.







Please use this category to submit articles that may not fit any of our upcoming themes.

How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  • Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.

  • Number all pages.

  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.

  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.

  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.