Educational Leadership, ASCD's flagship  journal, is intended for everyone interested in preK–12 education  issues, including curriculum, instruction, supervision, and leadership.  Each issue contains articles written by educators for educators. We  particularly look for articles that inspire improved teaching and  learning.

Educational Leadership is known for its theme issues. The more appropriate an article is for a theme issue, the more  likely it is that we will be able to publish it. We also accept articles on non-theme-related topics if the subject is compelling and timely.

The EL editorial staff makes all decisions regarding publication. ASCD reserves the right to reject material, whether solicited or otherwise, if it lacks quality or timeliness. ASCD offers no remuneration for articles.

 

What We Look For

The best way to determine what kinds of articles we publish is to read the magazine.

Most published articles are between 1,500 and 2,500 words, are written in a conversational style, and cover topics that are useful for preK–12 educators. These are some of the qualities we look  for:

  •  Articles describing research-based solutions to current problems in education
     
  •  Reasoned debate on controversial subjects
     
  •  Opinion pieces that interweave experiences and ideas
     
  •  Program descriptions (school, district, or state)
     
  •  Practical examples that illustrate key points
     
  •  An emphasis on explaining and interpreting research results rather than on methodology
     
  •  International contributions

We are not looking for term papers or reviews of literature, and we rarely publish conventional research reports. We cannot review drafts and usually do not find query letters helpful; we prefer to read the manuscript. We do not publish articles that have been previously published, in print or electronic form. While your article is under review with us, we ask that you not submit it to another publication or post it on a website or blog—not even your own.

Please submit your manuscript under the appropriate upcoming theme category. If your manuscript does not fit any of our upcoming themes, please submit it under the Special Topic category. Please do not submit the same manuscript under multiple categories--duplications will be withdrawn from consideration. 

For more information about the submission and editing process, please visit our web site.

Feedback for Impact

As the late Grant Wiggins wrote, “less teaching plus more feedback is the key to achieving greater learning.” This is as true for educators as it is for the students we work with. In this issue, we will explore the key characteristics of effective, actionable feedback—whether provided in the classroom, following a teacher observation, or during a coaching conversation—and how schools can create cultures of effective feedback and make the most of feedback for growth. Articles will look at feedback protocols and routines; evidence-based formative assessment strategies; best practices for differentiating and delivering feedback; and how to make feedback stick.

Submissions Deadline: November 1, 2021



How to Prepare Your Manuscript






  • Double-space all copy and number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address at the top of the manuscript. Also include names and email addresses of any coauthors.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript. 




        We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references.


        Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.



 

Ready for the Real World?

College and career readiness has long been an aspirational focus of schools. But with so much variability in students’ postsecondary options and pathways, that preparation can be a tall and continually shifting task. This issue will examine how educators can better support students in navigating a multilayered system of postsecondary choices and directions, including through college preparation; career and technical education (including STEM-focused programs); apprenticeships and internships; and financial and vocational information programs. Although focused on secondary education, this issue will also look at P–16 or P–20 models. In what ways does education need to change to prepare young people today for their futures?

Submissions Deadline: December 1, 2021



How to Prepare Your Manuscript







  • Double-space all copy and number all pages.
     
  • Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  • Include your name, address, phone number, and email address at the top of the manuscript. Also include names and email addresses of any coauthors.
     
  • Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript. 




        We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references.


        Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.



 

Please use this category to submit articles that may not fit any of our upcoming themes.

Note: While we do occasionally publish special topic articles of an exceptional nature, submissions that do not fit into an upcoming EL theme have a much smaller chance of publication. Response times on Special Topics submissions may also be longer. Thank you for your patience. 


How to Prepare Your Manuscript

  •  Double-space all copy and leave generous margins.
     
  •  Number all pages.
     
  •  Indicate the number of words in the manuscript, including references and figures.
     
  •  Include your name, address, phone number, and email address on the cover sheet.
     
  •  Include a two- or three-sentence bio for each author at the end of the manuscript.
     

We use the reference style outlined by the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.  Cite references in the text like this (Jones, 2000) and list them in a  bibliography at the end of the article. Please do not use footnotes or  endnotes for the references. For other matters of style, refer to The Chicago Manual of Style and Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.).

Authors bear full responsibility for the accuracy of citations, quotations, figures, and facts.




ASCD is committed to highlighting diverse voices in education and fostering a dynamic community of passionate thinkers who share ideas around problems of practice and leadership. To further these aims, we welcome submissions for online-only pieces on best practices, innovative and creative approaches, and ideas in K–12 education.

Long-form articles are typically between 1,000 and 2,000 words and cover research-based strategies, examples and stories from your own classroom, advice about how to overcome specific challenges, or solutions to common problems of practice. They are typically featured in ASCD Express, our twice-monthly email newsletter. 

Online pieces should be written in an approachable, conversational, inviting, nonacademic style. They should be directed toward an audience of practicing educators—including school and district leaders, instructional coaches and learning coordinators, and teachers—and focus on one or more of ASCD's core topic areas: curriculum and instruction; equity and cultural competency; leadership and management; social-emotional learning; technology; and whole child education.

What We Look For

In general, we look for pieces that are timely and topical, addressing current issues and problems of practice in the field in a concise, conversational, and lively manner. Articles should also be solution-oriented and grounded in authentic educational practice and evidence. Here are some examples of the types of online content we publish:

  • Best practice pieces on instructional or leadership strategies that offer immediate takeaways for readers.
  • Articles focused on specific problems of practice in a school community (whether at the classroom or leadership level) and proposed or attempted solutions.
  • Pieces highlighting or responding to recent developments, controversies, or research findings in the field.
  • Articles responding to current events and their implications for schools and educators.
  • Personal stories on professional challenges or successes.
  • Articles for school leaders (including teacher leaders) highlighting ideas and approaches to systemwide change and impact.
  • Articles focused on ideas and improvements in educator professional development.
  • Some of our most widely read topics include instructional strategies, engagement, leadership, professional learning, equity, curriculum, technology, school culture, assessment, classroom management, policy, and social-emotional learning

What We Don't Want

Types of content we are not likely to publish include term or grad-school papers; research reviews or reports; press releases or product promotions; organizational position/policy statements (including those masked as articles); and attack pieces or political rants. Our style is friendly, conversational, and relaxed. While evidence-based and substantive, the articles we publish are not academic in style and do not use excessive jargon or insider terms.

We also do not accept any content that, in whole or in part, has been previously published, in print or online. Nor do we accept pitches for guest posts. ASCD reserves the right to reject material, whether solicited or otherwise, on the basis of its evaluative criteria and current content needs. ASCD offers no remuneration for online articles.


Please allow one month for a response before querying about the status of your submission. 


We look forward to reading your work! 

Educational Leadership